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RESTORATION

We are working with rescued and re-homed wild horses and burros to restore 35 acres of land to health and biodiversity, turning previously overgrown and degraded pastures into thriving wetlands, upland meadows, woodland, and forest. By improving the soil and returning native plants to the land, we are working to support a diversity of native wildlife that either live here, pass through, or are returning to the land. The animals and plants give back by helping us make good compost and fertilizers to grow our organic fruit trees and vegetables, and the wild plants bring food, medicine, and fiber.

We aim to demonstrate how equids, as keystone species and ecosystem engineers, can be uniquely beneficial to the land when they are supported to live in a way that mimics their natural lifestyle. Unlike ruminants, such as cattle, goats, and sheep that ferment and digest their food efficiently, equids have single stomachs that allow vital seeds to pass fully intact through their digestive tract, coated in nutritious fertilizer and ready to germinate. Having upper and lower incisors, they gently prune vegetation as they graze, in contrast to ruminants that do not have upper teeth and have to work their jaws back and forth, tearing grasses up by the root.

 

Our resident equines are continually nourishing the soil by fertilizing the ground with their manure (that contains more nitrogen than that of cows), while re-seeding the land with their preferred wild forage. Their presence on the land is helping us to restore a healthy and diverse balance of grasses, forbs and legumes, and reduces the risk of wildfire through their removal of overgrowth and combustible brush fuel. 

 

Alongside our restoration work, we make our own compost and grow vegetables and fruit trees in collaboration with R.O.A.D. for Change, an Oregon based non-profit. We regularly donate compost to our local Tribal community, CTSI (Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and to the 25-mile No-Spray pollinator project run by the local non-profit organization, Concerned Citizens for Clean Air.

Meadow Making

Meadow Making